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Steven A. Greenburg, Education Law
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Posts tagged "suspension"

Truancy causes more than just problems for schools in California

If you have a child who is currently enrolled in school, chances are you are aware of the fact that schools take truancy from class very seriously. In California, if a student misses more than 30 minutes of class, they are considered tardy. If the student misses class and does not produce a valid excuse from a parent, then the truancy becomes an unexcused absence. Three or more truancies in a school year can result in the intervention from school administrators and a meeting with the student's parents. The more unexcused absences and truancies that accumulate, the more likely a student will be suspended or even face intervention from the district attorney.

The rules for suspension of disabled students in California

Most parents here in California have only a vague understanding about the laws that govern the schools within our state. It's because of this vague understanding that can leave parents at a disadvantage when it comes to recognizing when a violation of the law or their child's rights has occurred. It can also make dealing with potential legal issues a problem as well.

Students have rights, and the schools must respect them

When you think of the legal system, or a court of law, or a lawsuit, or really anything that deals with the terms "legal," your first thought probably isn't about schools and students. The two concepts simply don't mix, at least in the minds of many people. This could be due to the fact that we think of school and students as innocent and happy. That's the way they are supposed to be.

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